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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Blood lactate removal during varying intensities of active recovery following supramaximal work found in the catalog.

Blood lactate removal during varying intensities of active recovery following supramaximal work

Blood lactate removal during varying intensities of active recovery following supramaximal work

  • 187 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blood -- Analysis,
  • Lactic acid,
  • Exercise -- Physiological aspects

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Stephen L. Dodd.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationix, 64 leaves
    Number of Pages64
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13551882M
    OCLC/WorldCa11552052

    The effect of endurance training on lactate metabolism after supramaximal exercise was investigated in male ddY mice. The blood lactate concentration 20 min after supramaximal exercise in the trained mice was significantly lower than that in the control by: 8. Effect of Active and Passive Recovery on Blood Lactate and Performance During Simulated Effect of active and pas-sive recovery on blood lactate and performance during simulated competition in high level gymnasts. Can. J. Appl. Researchers have suggested different work intensities during the recovery period as optimal for lactate removal.

    AIM: High-intensity exercise is time-limited by onset of fatigue, marked by accumulation of blood lactate. This is accentuated at maximal, all-out exercise that rapidly accumulates high blood lactate. The optimal active recovery intensity for clearing lactate after such maximal, all-out exercise remains unknown. Thus, we studied the intensity-dependence of lactate clearance during active.   Effect of Different Types of Recovery on Blood Lactate Removal After Maximum Exercise. Introduction. Despite physiological changes caused by immersion in liquid medium, few studies have been conducted to determine the kinetics of blood lactate removal under these by: 6.

    This study examined the effect of active and passive recovery on lactate concentration and subsequent performance of repeated work bouts in 18 male NCAA Division I ice hockey players. Using a repeated measures design, subjects performed a series of skating tests before and after a minute recovery. ately bpm near to the end of the recovery interval. (11) During active recovery, increase in muscle blood flow, en-hances lactate exchange from active muscles to removal sites and increase the lactate oxidation, which has been described as the major pathway of lactate metabolism.(12) So the lactic acidAuthor: Karthikeyan G.


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Blood lactate removal during varying intensities of active recovery following supramaximal work Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Blood lactate removal during varying intensities of active recovery following supramaximal work. [Stephen L Dodd]. Blood lactate was measured at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 25, 30 minutes of recovery.

All active recovery work-rates (from 50+/-5% to 67+/-4% VO2max) were within the range previously reported for. Repeated blood lactate measurements showed faster clearance of lactate during active versus passive recovery, and that the decrease in lactate was more rapid during higher (% of lactate.

Repeated blood lactate measurements showed faster clearance of lactate during active versus passive recovery, and that the decrease in lactate was more rapid during higher (60–% of lactate threshold) than lower (0–40% of lactate threshold) (P Cited by:   The aim of this study was to compare the lactate (La) removal during active recovery at three different work rates below the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT).

Recently, it has been recommended that exercise intensity should be determined in relation to the IAT instead of the percentage of maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), especially for training and research by: Repeated blood lactate measurements showed faster clearance of lactate during active versus passive recovery, and that the decrease in lactate was more rapid during higher (% of lactate threshold) than lower (% of lactate threshold) (P Cited by: Heart rate, rating of perceived exertion during recovery, blood lactate and pH were recorded before each test protocol and during and after each recovery strategy.

The following findings emerged from comparison of the three recovery strategies: the type of recovery used had no significant effect on performance in the subsequent test protocol.

Lactate recovery curves were obtained after a 1-min all-out exercise. A biexponential time function was then used to determine the velocity constant of the slow phase (gamma(2)), which denoted the blood lactate removal ability. Fatigue indexes were calculated during 1-min all-out (FI(AO)) and repeated s (FI(Sprint)) cycling by: studied the patterns of blood lactate clearance during passive and active recovery over a range of exercise intensities.

We also studied the effect of self-regulated active recovery periods, by allowing the participants to control the active recovery exercise intensity. Methods The study was approved by the Institutional Review. Blood lactate removal rate (LaRR%) during the 30 min active recovery period was calculated using the following formula: LaRR% = (P – S) / (P – R) XWhere P is peak lactate concentration, S represents each of.

the lactate concentrations from the five recovery blood samples, and R is resting blood lactate concentration. LaRR. intensities to this marker, and then studied the patterns of blood lactate clearance during passive and active recovery over a range of exercise intensities.

We also studied the effect of self-regulated active recovery periods, by allowing the participant to control the active recovery exercise intensity. 4File Size: KB. Abstract. The breakdown of glycogen to lactate is an important mechanism which enables the muscles to perform rapid and heavy contractions.

However, the production of lactate during vigorous muscular exercise causes marked changes in the homeostasis of the Cited by: ATP-PC, LA, and O2 system are all involved in providing energy for all durations of exercise.

the ATP-PC portion of anaerobic metabolism predominates in activities lasting 10 sec or less while the LA portion of anaerobic metabolism is most important between sec and minutes of activity. Active recovery has proven an effective means in reducing blood lactate concentration ([La−]) after various activities, yet its effects on performance are less clear.

We investigated the effects of passive and active recovery on blood [La−], rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and. Based on a literature review, the current study aimed to construct mathematical models of lactate production and removal in both muscles and blood during steady state and at varying intensities during whole-body exercise.

In order to experimentally test the models in dynamic situations, a cross-country skier performed laboratory tests while treadmill roller skiing, from where work rate Cited by: Numerous studies have reported that following intense exercise the rate of blood lactate (La) disappearance is greater during continuous aerobic work than during passive by: Numerous studies have reported that following intense exercise the rate of blood lactate (La) disappearance is greater during continuous aerobic work than during passive recovery.

Recent work indicates that a combination of high- and low-intensity work may be optimal in reducing blood La. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the changes in Cited by: during supramaximal exercise contracting skeletal muscles produce and accumulate lactate and proton ions.

Lactate is either removed by oxidation in the muscle fibers or is released to the blood and removed by other cells according to the cell-cell lactate shuttle, which is facilitated by membrane-bound monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs; see by: for the tests (t1, t2); blood lactate (BLa) during T1, T2, and every 3 min during recovery; and heart rate (HR) during the recovery intervention and T2 were recorded.

Combined recovery was found to be better than passive (P. The work rate or oxygen uptake where there is a systematic decrease in blood lactate EPOC is generally higher following heavy exercise when compared to light exercise because Heavy exercise results in greater body heat gained, greater CP depletion and higher circulating blood epinephrine and norepinephrine levels.

1. Introduction. Blood lactate concentration ([La]) is a measure widely used to determine training intensity zones, quantify the effects of endurance training and/or to estimate the lactic energy expenditure of a given activity task.1, 2, 3 This blood [La] is the result of the balance between its appearance and removal.4, 5 Lactate can be produced by red blood cells, by the brain, by the gut Cited by: 2.

The purpose of this study was to test if the lactate exchange (γ1) and removal (γ2) abilities during recovery following short all-out supramaximal exercise correlate with the muscle content of MCT1 and MCT4, the two isoforms of the monocarboxylate transporters family involved in lactate and H+ co-transport in skeletal muscle.

Eighteen lightweight rowers completed a 3-min all-out exercise on Cited by: 4.The purpose of this study was to observe the differences in rates of blood lactate reduction (BLR) at three recovery intensities (40% VO₂max, 60% V02max, and combined recovery) when subjects are highly trained and aerobically fit.

Eight well-trained oarsmen (age = yr, Ht = cm, Wt = kg, VO₂max = 1 / min or ml / kg min⁻¹) were tested in one pre-experimental.